Why do we need an African/Caribbean census for 2021?

Updated: Jan 19


We aren't out numbered we're out organised


2021 is the year of national British census, which was last taken in 2011. We are very much in a different position of clarity moving in to 2021 than we were as African/Caribbean's in 2011. 2011 was largely marred by the Tottenham and national uprisings following the state assassination of Mark Duggan and the surrounding controversy with different witness accounts.



2021 is a post George Floyd era, where race and the treatment of the African Diaspora by European states has been consistent and clear in the systemic nature of how we are treated. In years gone by we had hope, in 2021 we have clarity that we must organise or perish. It is especially important that we understand the need to pivot in a COVID induced ushering in of a digital New World Order.



The Orwellian dystopia prophesised by the book 1984 is around the corner and operating currently in China, which is where we are headed. China is practically a cashless society where citizens are tracked by facial recognition and digital payment providers which is now retained by giant data centres where citizens are monitored and socially graded based on state measurements. Like fire we can keep ourselves warm or burn down a house and data is no different.

British African Diaspora ethnic breakdown from the England & Wales 2011 census


We are at a juncture in history where we are forced to ask how much complicity actually benefits our socio economic mobility. A mature question to ask is how much has it benefitted African/Caribbean's thus far? So the key collective question being asked is "do we continue to invest in the status quo or do we start to invest in our own self serving structures?"



It takes exactly the same time and commitment for the adult African/Caribbean population to invest in self serving structures as it does for us to invest in existing structures. The national census is taken every 10 years and the engagement requested by the British government via the National Office of Statistics is for us to take part by answering questions that break down our ethnicity, income, sex, career etc. and we comply by and large every decade.



It's no secret that African/Caribbean's don't trust governmental institutions in the same way that English people do so the current recorded census from 2011 isn't accurate but it is used to represent us. Herein lies the problem, a census that is inaccurate represents us irrespective of its floors.

British Ethnic household wealth breakdown source: www.afrinomica.com


The Malcolm X quote "We aren't outnumbered, we're out organised" is as relevant today as when he uttered it. The British (Eastern European) Jewish population is around 246K, whilst the British African Diaspora population is around 3 million (2 million in London and another million around the country). What we lack is institutional African/Caribbean organisation and effective representation.



There is only so long we can continue to ask the same detrimental questions whilst neither intending to answer them or do anything about the lack of effectively coordinated solutions. Today we have all of the personnel and tech delivery partners within the African/Caribbean community. We work in the civil service, we work within the foremost tech and research companies at senior levels and also own our own comparative companies as veterans who have chosen to go solo.



What are the potential benefits of us owning our own data?

Data is the new gold and we give it away for free to institutions that actually use our most sensitive information against our interests rather than to enable our socio economic mobility. Once we understand that an African/Caribbean national census will enable us to know our voter influence numbers by ward, our contribution to the national GDP, our business ownership, our household consumption numbers, our median earnings and contribution to industry by sector gives us huge leverage in every single area based on our population size.


Black voters just don't matter inspite of the two party political system rhetoric


2020 gave us in the UK a snapshot of how irrelevant the two party political system finds us by observing how both the Republican and Democratic Party's took us for granted. African Americans put the Biden government in office, largely based on the optics of positioning Kamala Harris (whom African Americans had a low approval rating of when she ran for the premier position).



The trophy of Kamala means absolutely nothing to African American interests because she openly and wantonly stated that she wouldn't do anything specifically for Blacks. Counter to voting based on emotion Ice Cube, informed by Dr Boyce Watkins, Dr Claud Anderson and Sandy Darity (leading African/American economists) produced a non partisan framework for African American exclusive tangibles in the Contract with Black America.



The Contract with Black America is a living document that invites contributions from expertise from vast sections of the African American population to exhaust every aspect of population needs. This is the sort of organisation that leads to the very leverage that changes policy based on ethnic consensus. Measured and scientific study can't be argued with by government institutions, which is why we have a strategy to partner with a university in order to monitor the processes and record evidence of our census.


President elect Joe Biden meeting with and scolding African America civil rights leaders


After refusing to meet with Ice Cube and his socio economic team (until after the elections, which takes for granted that African/Americans should be quiet and just vote Democrat) Joe Biden and Vice President elect Kamala Harris met with African American civil rights leaders and informed them that there will be no exclusive African American initiatives by executive order in the first 100 days, which is all that was being discussed.



The exact same premonition that Ice Cube and team made in the face of a huge Black liberal backlash is exactly what happened and the more experienced of us knew based on historical reference was inevitable. Only by independently organising African American experts to work in sweat equity to produce self serving initiatives, statistics and contracts for and on behalf of the African American population.



The culmination of expertise creates an ethnic consensus that produces leverage. That leverage is utilised for and on behalf of the wider population to advance socio economic mobility. The only outcome we should intelligently be looking for as adults is the socio economic advancement from the position we're in to a better position and since we are collectively at the bottom of every measurable metric we should be able to establish a collective consensus.


UK Census 2021


What is the purpose of ADPAC holding a national African/Carbbean census?

Through 3 years of consultation, initially around African/Caribbean election influence by ward and block voting to empower the African/Caribbean population ADPAC has collated hundreds of hours of public contribution that has lead us to this point.


· Accurate African/Caribbean voter population by ward

· Accurate African/Caribbean contribution to the UK GDP

· Accurate breakdown of population by industry

· Accurate median family income


What this accurate data enables the African/Caribbean community to do is utilise our leverage politically by sharing our eligible voter population by ward to affect how candidates deal with us. It also enables our political action committees to nurture block voting based on African/Caribbean interests to establish greater collective socio economic mobility.



In understanding the African/Caribbean contribution to the GDP it enables us to influence business behaviour, legislation, our relationship with banking, education and many other areas. This is a very similar approach to the breakdown by industry, which will enable us to focus on sector incomes and close the ethnic pay gaps.










LOWER BANNER 1.jpg
  • Black YouTube Icon
  • Black Facebook Icon
  • Black Twitter Icon

©2020 African Diaspora Public Affairs Committee (ADPAC)